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Webcams

You never have to miss the Peninsula again! Visit all the area webcams conveniently in one place. Thank you to all of the individuals and local businesses who allow us to host their live feeds for your enjoyment. Click any of the locations below to view the cam of your choice and watch this page for all the web cams of the Long Beach Washington Peninsula Area.

Clam Cam (Klipsan Beach)

Welcome to the Klipsan Beach Approach!

The Klipsan Beach Clam Cam is located at the beach approach at 225th and Highway 103/Pacific Way in Klipsan Beach. The webcam looks out over the Pacific Ocean, about midway on the Long Beach Peninsula. During razor clam season, you can see clammers digging along our beautiful beach. 

Heron Cam (Downtown Long Beach)

The Heron Cam

The Long Beach Heron Cam is a live web cam which updates its images here every 45 seconds. This camera views the fountain and pond in front of Pacific Realty at the main downtown intersection of Long Beach, Washington. (Bolstad & Pacific Hwy.)

When the natural fountain was created in 2000, the pond was stocked with a variety of goldfish. It didn’t take long for local Great Blue Herons to start gazing from the sky, working up the courage to drop down for an easy meal. The notably cautious and elegant birds soon began dropping in for a quick snack with some regularity. If you visit often you may see one of these regal birds swooping in for a fishy tidbit.

Thanks to Pacific Realty for allowing us to showcase the Heron Cam on this site.

Weather Cam (Long Beach)

The 642weather Cam is located on Sandridge Road in Long Beach, WA near Pioneer Road. It looks E-NE toward the Willapa Hills and updates its image every 5 minutes.

For a lot of great weather tools, time lapse and other images from this cam, visit 642weather.com.

Thanks to the 642weather.com, owner/operators of the Weather Cam.

Astoria-Megler Bridge (Washington)

The Astoria-Megler Bridge Cam looks south from the Washington entrance to the bridge, nestled between the Lewis & Clark Expedition’s Station Camp and Dismal Nitch.

The Astoria-Megler Bridge is just over four miles long (21,474 feet) crossing the Columbia River at its mouth. The main span is a 2,468-foot steel cantilever through truss, and is flanked by five steel deck trusses, one hundred forty 80-foot concrete deck girder spans, and, at the Washington end of the bridge, seven 350-foot steel through truss spans. The southern high steel girder section of this bridge forms the world’s longest continuous truss bridge, with a 1232 feet span.

The bridge was designed jointly by the Oregon and Washington state highway departments. Construction was begun in 1962, and completed in 1966. This bridge was subject to a toll for 30 years but the toll booths have now been removed.

Thanks to the Washington Department of Transportation for allowing us to showcase the Bridge Cam on this site. This cam experiences extreme weather and is, as a result, offline from time to time, particularly during the stormy winter months.

Astoria-Megler Bridge (Oregon)

The Astoria-Megler Bridge Cam is a live web cam which updates its images every 5 minutes. This camera is perched atop the Astoria-Megler Bridge, facing the Washington shoreline just a stone’s throw from Station Camp of the end of the Lewis and Clark Expedition. Turn left at the Washington side of the bridge and you are just minutes from the Long Beach Peninsula.

The Astoria-Megler Bridge is just over four miles long (21,474 feet) crossing the Columbia River at its mouth. The main span is a 2,468-foot steel cantilever through truss, and is flanked by five steel deck trusses, one hundred forty 80-foot concrete deck girder spans, and, at the Washington end of the bridge, seven 350-foot steel through truss spans. The southern high steel girder section of this bridge forms the world’s longest continuous truss bridge, with a 1232 feet span.

The bridge was designed jointly by the Oregon and Washington state highway departments. Construction was begun in 1962, and completed in 1966. This bridge was subject to a toll for 30 years but the toll booths have now been removed.

Thanks to the Oregon Department of Transportation for allowing us to showcase the Bridge Cam on this site. This cam experiences extreme weather and is, as a result, offline from time to time, particularly during the stormy winter months.

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